This rosary (or chaplet as it could also be called) is an especially humbling prayer.  As we meditate on the sorrows of our Blessed Mother,  from the disquieting  prophecy of Simeon to the  anguish of His crucifixion, death and burial, we may find solace and strength  in the realization that because of the depth of  her  sufferings, she  clearly recognizes ours.  With this prayer, we are able to hide ourselves  within her heart and wipe our tears with her mantle.

Sparkling Czech crystal is the bead chosen for this edition of  the Servite rosary. We begin with clear crystal representing Mary’s crystal tears.  Because of the color’s association to Mary, we’ve selected seven shades of blue for the heart of the rosary. Representing her first sorrow, we begin with  pale blue. As we pray our way to the seventh sorrow, each set of seven beads becomes deeper and darker.  When we reach the final sorrow, the Burial of Jesus,  the beads are  a deep blue, appearing near black. All medals are base silver tone. This solemn  rosary is 24” long.
Your Servite rosary will be shipped in a silk-like pouch and gift box and will include a booklet with an explanation of it’s history and instructions for it’s prayer.

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Hand Crafted "One of a Kind",   Limited Edition and 
CustomRosaries and Chaplets
   Seven Sorrows of Mary  Chaplet
(Servite Rosary)

  
Gardenias4Lina 
This devotion, which brings to mind the seven sorrows of Mary (see below) has a long history which began with the Servites (Servants of Mary) in Monte Senario Italy about the time the order was started (1233), on the feast of the Assumption.  Seven professional men from Florence, which was an important commercial center of Europe,  were influenced by the repenting spirit common to the Brothers of Penance with whom they were in close contact.  It is believed that Mary came to them and requested that they devote themselves to her service.  In 1240 they withdrew from the world to pray and serve the Lord, leading a life of penance, prayer and service to 'St Mary'. Because of so many visitors, they retreated again to Monte Senario, nearby where Mary again visited the men.    Here the Servites were formed. By 1244, under the direction of St Peter of  Verona, they began to wear a religious habit similar to the Dominicans and began to live under the rule of Saint Augustine. The order took on new life and before the end of the 14 century had over 100 convents throughout Europe, India and Crete. The Servites devoted their prayer to the rosary of the Seven Sorrows. 

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Seven Sorrows of Mary

1. Prophecy of Simeon. 
Reading: Luke 2: 25-35.

2. Flight into Egypt. 
Matthew 2: 13-15.

3. Loss of the Child Jesus in the temple. 
Reading: Luke 2: 41-50.

4. Meeting of Jesus and Mary on the Way of the Cross. 
Reading: Luke 23: 27-29.

5. Crucifixion. 
John 19: 25-30.

6. Taking down of the Body of Jesus from the Cross. 
Reading: Psalm 130. 

7. Burial of Jesus 
Luke 23: 50-56.


Like the Holy Rosary, the Seven Sorrows is a "bead-prayer. There are 49 beads in the strand, organized into seven sets of seven beads. Each set is preceded by a medal illustrating one of the Seven Sorrows. The beads in the circlet are used to pray the "Hail Mary." The medals are used for the "Our Father." The medal for the First Sorrow (The Prophecy of Simeon) closes the circlet. It connects to a pendant  string of four more beads, ending with a larger medal depicting the Virgin of Sorrows. The beads in the pendant string represent the final prayers.


Praying the Servite Rosary

Begin with an act of contrition to clear any obstacle before God and Our Blessed Mother. 

"O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee, and I detest all my sins, because I dread the loss of heaven and the pains of hell, but most of all because they offend Thee, my God, who art all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of Thy grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life. Amen." 

Pray one Our Father along with seven Hail Marys after meditating each sorrow of Our Blessed Mother. 

The final prayers are: three more "Hail Marys", to honor the tears of the Sorrowful Virgin; one "Our Father", one "Hail Mary", and one "Glory Be" for the intentions of the Pope; an invocation to the Sorrowful Virgin (optional) and a concluding offertory (optional).

Invocation to the Sorrowful Virgin 

Mary, Mother of God, Mother of Sorrows, lift me up when I am feeling sad and in times of trouble. Be my inspiration, my strength and my comfort throughout my life. Help me to accept the will of God with complete faith as you did. Help me to embrace the Gospel of Life and not a culture of death and to live accordingly. Embrace me with your motherly love and affection drawing me safely into the protection of your pierced and immaculate heart. Amen.


Seven Sorrows of Mary

1. Prophecy of Simeon. 
Reading: Luke 2: 25-35.

Now there was a man in Jerusalem called Simeon, who was righteous and devout. He was waiting for the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was upon him. It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not die before he had seen the Lord's Christ. Moved by the Spirit, he went into the temple courts. When the parents brought in the child Jesus to do for him what the custom of the Law required, Simeon took him in his arms and praised God, saying: 
"Sovereign Lord, as you have promised, you now dismiss  your servant in peace. 
For my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the sight of all people, 
a light for revelation to the Gentiles 
and for glory to your people Israel." The child's father and mother marveled at what was said about him. Then Simeon blessed them and said to Mary, his mother: "This child is destined to cause the falling and rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be spoken against, so that the thoughts of many hearts will be revealed. And a sword will pierce your own soul too." 

2. Flight into Egypt. 
Matthew 2: 13-15.

When they had gone, an angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream. "Get up," he said, "take the child and his mother and escape to Egypt. Stay there until I tell you, for Herod is going to search for the child to kill him." So he got up, took the child and his mother during the night and left for Egypt, where he stayed until the death of Herod. And so was fulfilled what the Lord had said through the prophet: "Out of Egypt I called my son."

3. Loss of the Child Jesus in the temple. 
Reading: Luke 2: 41-50.

Every year his parents went to Jerusalem for the Feast of the Passover. When he was twelve years old, they went up to the Feast, according to the custom. After the Feast was over, while his parents were returning home, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem, but they were unaware of it. Thinking he was in their company, they traveled on for a day. Then they began looking for him among their relatives and friends. When they did not find him, they went back to Jerusalem to look for him. After three days they found him in the temple courts, sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions. Everyone who heard him was amazed at his understanding and his answers. When his parents saw him, they were astonished. His mother said to him, "Son, why have you treated us like this? Your father and I have been anxiously searching for you." 
"Why were you searching for me?" he asked. "Didn't you know I had to be in my Father's house?" But they did not understand what he was saying to them. 

4. Meeting of Jesus and Mary on the Way of the Cross. 
Reading: Luke 23: 27-29.

A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him. Jesus turned and said to them, "Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children. For the time will come when you will say, 'Blessed are the barren women, the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!' 

5. Crucifixion. 
John 19: 25-30.

Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. When Jesus saw his mother there, and the disciple whom he loved standing nearby, he said to his mother, "Dear woman, here is your son," and to the disciple, "Here is your mother." From that time on, this disciple took her into his home. 
Later, knowing that all was now completed, and so that the Scripture would be fulfilled, Jesus said, "I am thirsty." A jar of wine vinegar was there, so they soaked a sponge in it, put the sponge on a stalk of the hyssop plant, and lifted it to Jesus' lips. When he had received the drink, Jesus said, "It is finished." With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit. 

6. Taking down of the Body of Jesus from the Cross. 
Reading: Psalm 130. 
Out of the depths I cry to you, O LORD; 
O Lord, hear my voice. 
Let your ears be attentive 
to my cry for mercy. 
If you, O LORD, kept a record of sins, 
O Lord, who could stand? 
But with you there is forgiveness; 
therefore you are feared. 
I wait for the LORD, my soul waits, 
and in his word I put my hope. 
My soul waits for the Lord 
more than watchmen wait for the morning, 
more than watchmen wait for the morning. 
O Israel, put your hope in the LORD, 
for with the LORD is unfailing love 
and with him is full redemption. 
He himself will redeem Israel 
from all their sins.

7. Burial of Jesus 
Luke 23: 50-56.

Now there was a man named Joseph, a member of the Council, a good and upright man, who had not consented to their decision and action. He came from the Judean town of Arimathea and he was waiting for the kingdom of God. Going to Pilate, he asked for Jesus' body. Then he took it down, wrapped it in linen cloth and placed it in a tomb cut in the rock, one in which no one had yet been laid. It was Preparation Day, and the Sabbath was about to begin. 
The women who had come with Jesus from Galilee followed Joseph and saw the tomb and how his body was laid in it. Then they went home and prepared spices and perfumes. But they rested on the Sabbath in obedience to the commandment.



All rosary and chaplet designs copyright Marilyn Nash